Apollo Capsule Locations

The Apollo program was a monumental effort by NASA to land humans on the Moon and safely return them to Earth. It was one of the most ambitious and successful space exploration projects in history.

The program spanned from the early 1960s to the early 1970s and consisted of a series of crewed missions, each building upon the knowledge and technology gained from previous missions. The Apollo program achieved its primary goal with the successful landing of Apollo 11 on the lunar surface in 1969.

The Apollo capsules are located in various museums and institutions around the world. Here is a list of the Apollo missions and their command modules along with their locations:

Apollo 1 (AS-204):

While not a completed mission, Apollo 1 was intended to be the first crewed flight of the Apollo program. However, a cabin fire during a pre-launch test on January 27, 1967, tragically claimed the lives of astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger B. Chaffee. The mission was originally designated AS-204.

The Apollo 1 command module after the fire.

The Apollo 1 capsule is currently in storage at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia but the capsule’s hatch is on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Titusville, Florida.

Apollo 7:

Launched on October 11, 1968, with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn Eisele, and Walter Cunningham. The command module for this mission was named “Gumdrop.”

The Apollo 7 Command Module on display at the Frontiers of Flight Museum in Dallas, Texas

In 1970, NASA transferred the Apollo 7 command module to the Smithsonian Institution. The Apollo 7 capsule is currently on display at the Frontiers of Flight Museum in Dallas, Texas.

Apollo 8:

Launched on December 21, 1968, with astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders. The Command Module was named “Columbia.” This mission marked the first human journey to the Moon and the first orbit around the moon.

The Apollo 8 Command Module on the deck of the USS Yorktown after being recovered on 27 December 1968.

In 1971, the Apollo 8 Capsule was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution. It was briefly displayed at two NASA centers before being loaned to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, IL where it is currently on display. Also on display at the museum is the Aurora 7 capsule from the Mercury program.

Apollo 9:

Launched on March 3, 1969, with astronauts James McDivitt, David Scott, and Rusty Schweickart. The command module was named “Gumdrop” and the lunar module was named “Spider.”

This mission was the first crewed flight to include a lunar module and its primary objective was to test the lunar module in Earth orbit. The lunar module was jettisoned into orbit after the objective was completed.

Apollo 9 AS-504 Gumdrop San Diego Air & Space Museum, San Diego, CA

In 1973, NASA transferred the Apollo 9 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution by NASA. The Apollo 9 capsule was on display at the Michigan Space and Science Center for nearly 20 years before being sent to the San Diego Air & Space Museum in 2004 where it is still on display.

Apollo 10:

Launched on May 18, 1969, with astronauts Tom Stafford, John Young, and Gene Cernan. The command module was named “Charlie Brown” and the lunar module was named “Snoopy.”

This mission conducted a dress rehearsal for the lunar landing. The lunar module was jettisoned into orbit after the objective was completed.

Apollo 10 Command Module at the Science Museum in London, England

In 1970, NASA transferred the Apollo 10 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution. The capsule toured several countries in Europe that year, including the USSR, France and the Netherlands, before being loaned to the London Science Museum where it is still on display.

Apollo 11:

Launched on July 16, 1969, with astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. The command module was named “Columbia” and the lunar module was named “Eagle.” Armstrong and Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon.

After the astronauts returned to the Columbia from the lunar surface, the Eagle was jettisoned to deliberately crash into the moon in order to provide artificial moonquake sources for seismic experiments.

Apollo 11 Columbia on display in the Milestones of Flight exhibition hall at the National Air and Space Museum.

In 1971, NASA transferred the Apollo 11 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution, after a tour of America, and is currently on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C. Also on display at the museum is the Gemini 7 capsule and a Saturn V rocket.

Apollo 12:

Launched on November 14, 1969, with astronauts Charles “Pete” Conrad, Alan L. Bean, and Richard F. Gordon. The command module was named “Yankee Clipper” and the lunar module was named “Intrepid.”

Intrepid was jettisoned towards the moon after the astronauts returned to the Yankee Clipper from the lunar surface.

The Apollo 12 capsule at the Virginia Air and Space Center

In 1973, NASA transferred the Apollo 12 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution and it is currently on display at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton, VA.

Apollo 13:

Launched on April 11, 1970, with astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., Fred W. Haise Jr. and John L. Swigert Jr. The command module was named “Odyssey” and the lunar module was named “Aquarius.”

This mission famously experienced an oxygen tank explosion which forced the astronauts to abandon the lunar landing and return to Earth.

Apollo 13 Command Module in Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, KS

Just before re-entry, the astronauts jettisoned the Aquarius and the Service Module of the Odyssey into orbit where they presumably burned up in the earth’s atmosphere.

NASA transferred the Apollo 13 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution and it is currently on display at the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas. Also on display at the Cosmosphere is the Liberty Bell 7 capsule from the Mercury program.

Apollo 14:

Launched on January 31, 1971, with astronauts Alan Shepard, Edgar Mitchell, and Stuart Roosa. The command module was named “Kitty Hawk” and the lunar module was named “Antares.”

The Antares was jettisoned towards the moon after the astronauts returned to the Kitty Hawk from the lunar surface.

Apollo 14 Module Kitty Hawk on display at the Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center

In 1974, NASA transferred the Apollo 14 capsule to the Smithsonian Institution and it is currently on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Titusville, FL. Also on display at the space center is the Sigma 7 capsule from the Mercury program, a Saturn V rocket, the Space Shuttle Atlantis and wreckage from the Space Shuttles Columbia and Challenger.

Apollo 15:

Launched on July 26, 1971, with astronauts David R. Scott, James B. Irwin, and Alfred M. Worden. The command module was named “Endeavour” and the lunar module was named “Falcon.”

The Falcon was jettisoned towards the moon after the astronauts returned to the Endeavour from the lunar surface.

Apollo 15 Command Module at the National Museum of the United States Air Force

In 1974, NASA transferred the Apollo 15 capsule to the National Air and Space Museum and it is currently on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum in Ohio.

Apollo 16:

Launched on April 16, 1972, with astronauts John W. Young, Charles M. Duke, and Thomas K. Mattingly II. The command module was named “Casper” and the lunar module was named “Orion.”

The Orion was later jettisoned towards the moon after the astronauts returned to the Casper from the lunar surface.

Apollo 16 Command and Service Module Casper approaches the Lunar Module near the moon in 1972

In 1974, NASA transferred the Apollo 16 command module to the Smithsonian Institution and it is currently on display at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Apollo 17:

Launched on December 7, 1972, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Harrison H. Schmitt, and Ronald E. Evans. The command module was named “America” and the lunar module was named “Challenger.”

This mission marked the final crewed lunar landing. The Challenger was later jettisoned towards the moon after the astronauts returned to the America from the lunar surface.

The Apollo 17 capsule is currently on display at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Also on display at the space center is the Gemini 5 capsule from the Gemini program and the Faith 7 capsule from the Mercury program.

Pacific Fleet Angels recovers an Apollo 17 astronaut from the America capsule on December 19, 1972

These are the twelve crewed Apollo missions which each contributed to NASA’s historic achievements in space exploration.

These capsules are treasured artifacts that allow visitors to learn about the historic Apollo missions, space exploration, and the incredible achievements of the astronauts and engineers who made the moon landings possible.

Have you seen an Apollo capsule in any of these places? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think of it!

Sources:
“Apollo: Where Are They Now?” NSSDC, nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/apolloloc.html
“NSSDCA/COSPAR ID:1969-018A.” NASA, nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/spacecraft/display.action?id=1969-018A
“Command Module Apollo 17.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-17/nasm_A19740022000
“Apollo 17 Command Module.” Space Center Houston, spacecenter.org/exhibits-and-experiences/starship-gallery/apollo-17-command-module/
“Command Module, Apollo 16.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-16/nasm_A19740499000
“Command Module, Apollo 15.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-15/nasm_A19740605000
“Command Module, Apollo 14.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-14/nasm_A19750212000
“Command Module, Apollo 13.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-13/nasm_A19740651000
“Command Module, Apollo 12.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-12/nasm_A19730364000
“Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-11/nasm_A19700102000
“Command Module, Apollo 10.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-10/nasm_A19740525000
“Apollo 9 Command Module.” San Diego Air and Space Museum, sandiegoairandspace.org/collection/item/apollo-9-command-module
“Command Module, Apollo 9.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-9/nasm_A19740649000
“Command Module, Apollo 8.” National Air and Space Musuem airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-8/nasm_A19711856000
“Command Module, Apollo 7.” National Air and Space Museum, airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/command-module-apollo-7/nasm_A19740718000#:~:text=The%20mission%20ended%20uneventfully%20with,the%20Smithsonian%20Institution%20in%201970.
“What Was the Apollo Program?” NASA, 18 July 2019, nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-was-apollo-program-58.html
“Apollo Missions.” NASA, nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/missions/index.html

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